A Horse Shoe Of Traffic Flows: Getting Lost On A Straight Line

Remember that car we bought? Well, it didn’t exactly come with a driver’s license. I never had one, because it was never that necessary. I had my bike, I walked everywhere, and students in the Netherlands get a public transport card that allows them to travel for free on either all weekdays or in the weekend. Of course, it would have been nice to be able to drive, so I had started saving some money to get my license. Yes, saving money, because unlike an American license, the Dutch version comes only after driving school, which can cost around a sweet $2,000 (not a typo). After saving for a little while, I met Mrs Missouri, who lived so far away I rerouted my license money towards travel expenses. As I always expected to end up living in the US, as casual dating across the ocean does not work too well, I figured I’d get a license here, because it costs a total of $13,50, saving around $1,965. In Green Card money, that gets you about halfway.

Anyone else wonder why she would ever move away from Utopia? I mean, I like the States, but the two probably don't compare.

Anyone else wonder why she would ever move away from Utopia? I mean, I like the States, but the two probably don’t compare.

So, according to American customs, I studied hard for the written Multiple Choice test (I had quite some jokes about the level of questions, but I failed my first attempt, so I’ll let those slide), acquired a permit, and started driving under the supervision of my lovely wife. I think being taught how to drive by your spouse is a real test of your relationship, but we handled it pretty well, resulting in a very boring driving test and ultimately my own real driver’s license. To celebrate, I drove Mrs. Missouri to work this morning, and drove back home by myself. The great thing about having someone in the passenger seat that knows where to go, is that you automatically have the route spelled out for you. On my way home, I missed literally every exit I had to take. Moving from the I-70 to I-170, I missed my exit. No problem, I figured, I’ll just take the next exit and turn around there. In a perfect storm of getting lost, that next exit proved to be the airport. If all you want at an exit is to turn around, skip the airport, people. The one-way horse shoe road design might allow for a great traffic flow, but will not let you turn around for at least ten minutes. Back on the I-170 highway I turned east on the I-64, where I should have turned west, causing me to test my problem solving skills once more. Of course, neither of those moments were serious problems, but I clearly have to get familiar with figuring out where to go. It’ll be okay, I’m sure.

I wish I'd have had someone to be mad at, or a map to look at in a puzzling way, as if I were really lost.

I wish I’d have had someone to be mad at, or a map to look at in a puzzling way, as if I were really lost.

Advertisements

5 thoughts on “A Horse Shoe Of Traffic Flows: Getting Lost On A Straight Line

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s